Reviews

Little Mix Bring Nostalgia and Synth-Pop to New Track “Break up Song”

In the years since they won the X Factor, Little Mix have established themselves as one of the biggest girl groups ever, and arguably one of the longest-lasting. One of the factors that allows them such longevity is the diversity of their sound, possessing that unique ability to tap into numerous different genres.

After the urban R&B sound of the group’s 2018 record LM5, the group are now turning their attention back to full-blown pop with “Break Up Song.”

Describing how the track came about, Jade Thirlwall said that the girls “got that jittery feeling that we had with ‘Shout Out to My Ex’ and ‘Black Magic,’ where it just felt special.” “Break Up Song,” the lead single from their upcoming sixth studio album, exists very much in the same vein as those two prior releases. Penned by all four Little Mix members with frequent collaborators Kamille, Frank Nobel and Linus Nordstrom, the track deals with a familiar subject matter. “So tonight, I’ll sing another, another break-up song,” the foursome sings defiantly over the chorus, “So turn it up, let it play on and on and on and on.”

Sonically, the track sees the girls follow recent pop trends to nostalgic territories. Revitalised for the mainstream by Taylor Swift’s 1989, 80s synth-pop is now the go-to sound for pop’s biggest names like Lorde, Carly Rae Jepsen and Dua Lipa. Here, the girls lean in to that synth-wave, but bring their own personality to it as they always do, marrying the aesthetic with a big, chanting chorus reminiscent of their most popular work, like “Shout Out To My Ex,” and its album, Glory Days. That being said, it’s one of the more streamlined concept choices they have made since the funk-R&B of “Move.”

Overall, “Break Up Song” marks an interesting start to Little Mix’s latest era. Not hugely experimental, but still new enough to sound fresh, “Break Up Song” does its job perfectly as a lead single, sparking that flame of curiosity to see what the girls have up their sleeves.

Featured Image: RCA UK